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Thursday, May 19, 2016

What kind of first lady will Bill Clinton be if Hillary becomes president?

Former United States Presidents are typically still called "President So-and-

so" even after they leave office. It's a name so snazzy, so prestigious, and so seemingly singular that it never goes away.

However, in the case of Bill and Hillary Clinton, as in the case of a few other US Presidental dynasties, the title of POTUS may not be so singular.

If Hillary wins the White House, this will be the first time the President is a spouse of a former President, but there have been a few times Presidents have shared a last name. And when this happens, typically people refer to the former President by a nickname or by their full name:

If Hillary Clinton is elected president in 2016, the nation won’t just have its first female president. We’ll also have our first male spouse of a president — and the need for a title other than “first lady.” 

Late night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel asked the Democratic presidential candidate what Bill Clinton would be called in her White House. 

“It’s a little bit more complicated with him because people still call former presidents ‘Mr. President,’ so I have to really work on this,” Clinton said on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” on Thursday night. 

Vice President Bill Clinton

Constitution states that Vice President has to meet 

the eligibility requirements to become President. Bill Clinton is ineligible, having served two terms already. HOWEVER, the eligibility clause was written before term limits were established. When written, that requirement referred only to being a natural born citizen, at least 35 years old, 14 years a resident of the United States, who's never been impeached or participated in a rebellion against the US, all of which Bill Clinton meets.

Of course, it would be easy to argue that the advent of term limits expands that list. However, that  question has never been officially ruled on. In the very unlikely event that a two-term president tried to run for the Presidency, it would presumably come up in the courts and be ruled upon. Until then, we can only argue.

My tentative answer is that “eligible” roughly means “elected.” I realize that this is far from perfect evidence — it’s 40 years later than the usage — but the earliest law dictionary that I could find that contained the term, Bouvier’s (1843), defines “eligibility” as “capacity to be elected.” (I take it that, by extension, for appointed offices it would mean “capacity to be appointed.”) If that’s how the term was understood in 1804, then Clinton would not be eligible to the office of president, and thus under the 12th Amendment not eligible to the office of vice president.

Could Bill Clinton Be Vice President If Hillary Clinton Wins,http://1stfirstgentleman.com/

The original Constitution had no requirements for the office of vice president.

However, the 12th Amendment, ratified in 1804, said that, "no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States."
So that would mean that a vice president would have to meet the requirements to be president laid out in Article II of the Constitution. Principally, the person would have to be born in the United States, be at least 35 years of age and have been a resident of this country for the preceding 14 years. So far, so good. Maybe a former president, like Bill Clinton, could serve as vice president.

Electing Bill as VP for Hillary would be difficult, because they're from the same state.  The Constitution forbids the 538 electors from voting for a President and VP from their own state.  Hillary and Bill are both from New York now, so the 29 electors of New York could either vote for Hillary or Bill but not both.  Needless to say, that is less than optimal.

Now, if someone else were elected VP and either died or resigned, Hillary could appoint Bill to replace them as VP. But the Congress has to approve.  Would they?  It looks like we'll still have a Republican Congress.  

Why would Hillary waste the position on someone who's out of the game, so to speak?  She can win points with her party with that assignment, so wasting it on her husband wouldn't help.

Could Bill Clinton Serve in Hillary's Administration?

Hillary Clinton has yet to win the democratic party nomination, let alone the 2016 Presidential election. But if she accomplishes both feats, as she’s currently favored to do, one of the defining personnel choices of her administration will come with an odd twist. We’re not referring to the Vice Presidential running mate, who will likely be a younger up and comer such as Cory Booker or Julian Castro. Instead we’re talking about Secretary of State. It’s a role which has helped define the last few Presidencies, particularly in this time of international transition. And the two names at the top of the list will likely be Joe Biden and Bill Clinton.

Theoretically, the 42nd president of the United States would be eligible to serve in his wife's cabinet, though some legal scholars might raise concerns if she were to nominate him secretary of state.

Were the former president to be confirmed to secretary of state it would place him in the line of succession to the presidency, and should his wife and her vice president become unable to serve Bill Clinton would become president - an ascension some scholars believe would be in violation of the spirit of the Constitution's 22nd Amendment prohibition on president's serving a third term.

What Will Bill Clinton Do in the White House?

The fact is that Bill Clinton is no longer Bill Clinton, or at least not the Bill 

Add caption
Clinton those of us remember from the 1990s. It’s been 16 years since Bill left office. Thanks to a worshipful mainstream media and the willful blindness of his fans, the same guy who lied under oath about harassing vulnerable women morphed into a lovable rogue.

Good old Bill, with his Irishman’s smile and before-it-was-cool dad bod! He sure likes Big Macs, attention, and *wink wink* the ladies!

But Bill has changed, and worse for him – and for Hillary – so have the times. His mischievous leprechaun smile now seems painted on as he is called out once again to the campaign trail to try to win his wife her own political pot of gold. His chubby frame has melted into a sickly shadow of its former self as the Big Macs gave way to a vegan diet that explains his sallow visage. And the attention once lavished upon him is now falling upon Hillary; he stands to the side, an afterthought, yearning for that spotlight to move back onto him.

Hillary Clinton moved into the White House in 1993, she was not granted the same flexibility. As the chair of the Task Force on National Health Care reform, she was slammed in the press for stepping beyond the reaches of her role, in spite of her clear qualifications to work on policy: the implication was that she was being unladylike. To many Americans, the revelations about her husband’s extramarital sexual proclivities confirmed their belief that Hillary was failing to fulfill the remit of the first lady: to be a pleasant and decorative hostess who represents a “traditional” and anachronistic family: a man in charge, a faithful and helpful woman by his side (even though a number of other presidents and first ladies have also had notable affairs). Indeed, Clinton blamed the affair in part on herself for failing as a wife.

Madame President's Husband: What Will the first First Gent Do?

Former United States Presidents are typically still called "President So-and-

Madame President's Husband: What Will the first First Gent Do
 so" even after they leave office. It's a name so snazzy, so prestigious, and so seemingly singular that it never goes away.

However, in the case of Bill and Hillary Clinton, as in the case of a few other US Presidental dynasties, the title of POTUS may not be so singular.

If Hillary wins the White House, this will be the first time the President is a spouse of a former President, but there have been a few times Presidents have shared a last name. And when this happens, typically people refer to the former President by a nickname or by their full name:

First Gentleman, whether he is or not. An ex-president is always called "President So-and-so", so if Hilary Clinton is elected President, there will be two President Clintons in the White House. They will be referred to as President Bill Clinton and President Hilary Clinton according to custom, so it is not likely that Bill will be called the "First Gentleman" at all.

One half-century ago, as President Lyndon B. Johnson was running for his own full term in 1964, Polly Bergen starred in the comedy Kisses for My President, the first feature film to feature the first woman President.

The focus, however, is less about Madame President Leslie Harrison McCloud and more about that man she married.

Bergen’s co-star Fred MacMurray depicted another “first” in political film history, the “First Male First Lady,” as the movie poster declared.

His character of Thad McCloud was a rather hapless presidential spouse, wandering around the White House uncertain about his what his public role should be.

When he stumbles into the East Wing, he discovers his staff of a Social Secretary and Personal Secretary, who cluck and coo to him that his life could be “one mad social whirl” if he was willing to preside over ribbon-cutting ceremonies and attend fashion show luncheons fundraisers.

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Bill Clinton "First Lady" Nickname 1st First Gentleman,www.1stfirstgentleman.com

While Hillary has been pretty mum about her plans for a 2016 run for the 

Bill Clinton "First Lady" Nickname 1st First Gentleman1stfirstgentleman.com
White House and distracting us with her uncanny Vladimir Putin impressions, her husband seems to want to join her on the comedy circuit.

The former president was asked by Rachel Ray, during a taping of an upcoming episode, what his title would be if Hillary becomes the first female President. 

The last White House to have a hostess who was not the wife of the president was exactly a century ago during the tenure of Woodrow Wilson.
After Wilson's first wife, Ellen, died a year and a half into his presidency, their daughter, Margaret Woodrow Wilson, formally took on the role of first lady at age 28 for more than a year until the president remarried in 1915.
The only daughter of Benjamin Harrison, Mary McKee, also became the face of the East Wing after her mother Caroline died. She was 34 when she assumed the role, which she held until the end of her father's time as the nation's chief executive.
Likewise, Martha Jefferson Randolph's mother, also named Martha, had already passed away when her father, Thomas Jefferson, was elected to serve in the Oval Office. That left the 28-year-old daughter of the nation's third president to manage the East Wing.
In other instances, daughters-in-laws, sisters and even a niece fulfilled the duties of the first lady when the position was otherwise vacant.

Hillary Clinton Has Some Ideas For Bill's "First Lady" Nicknam

“First Husband?” Joy Behar inquired. “First Grandpa, First Pop-Pop?” she 

asked, citing granddaughter Charlotte’s nickname for the former president.

“Well, we really should run kind of a contest,” Clinton joked (an idea that runs the risk of Bill Clinton being nicknamed “Saxophone McPresidentface,” or something similar).

Thankfully, Clinton seemed to have a few more dignified ideas in mind. “Some people have said First Gentleman, which, obviously, that fits.” She tallied on her fingers — “Others have said First Mate, which I thought was kind of… Others have said First Dude.”

 “First Husband?” Joy Behar inquired. “First Grandpa, First Pop-Pop?” she asked, citing granddaughter Charlotte’s nickname for the former president.

“Well, we really should run kind of a contest,” Clinton joked (an idea that runs the risk of Bill Clinton being nicknamed “Saxophone McPresidentface,” or something similar).

Thankfully, Clinton seemed to have a few more dignified ideas in mind. “Some people have said First Gentleman, which, obviously, that fits.” She tallied on her fingers — “Others have said First Mate, which I thought was kind of… Others have said First Dude.”

No matter what they'll wind up calling him, though, Clinton refused to say her husband wouldn’t be part of a Hillary Clinton presidency. “I hope he would be involved,” she said, before moving forward to a discussion of the economy and the aftermath of the Great Recession. 

If a male president's wife is the first lady, what would a female president's husband be known as? First man? First gentleman, First what?

Although other individuals may be called "First Lady" or "First Gentlemen", none are official positions. In contrast, the First Lady of the United States heads an office within the Executive Office of the President (the Presidents "inner circle", run by his Chief of Staffs), called the Office of the First Lady of the United States, which oversees both the First Ladies personal staff and official ceremonies and decorations at the White House. This includes things like booking travel and hotels, arranging services for guests, and overseeing events like the Easter Egg hunt and Halloween trick-or-treating.

By definition, the First Lady is "the wife or hostess of the chief executive of a country or jurisdiction." The term was first used to describe the first-first lady, Martha Washington, and her responsibilities were typically seeing to the comfort of visiting politicians and dignitaries. Even though the title of "First Lady" is an optional one—meaning Michelle Obama could have called herself Boss Woman, First Mate, or DJ fLoTuS. However, no woman who has held the unofficial position has broken with the traditional title.

What would Bill Clinton's role be if Hillary is elected President?

Rolled oats propelled Hillary Clinton to victory in 1992. They were the game-

changing ingredient in her recipe for chocolate chip cookies, which she submitted to Family Circle magazine in a bake-off against then-incumbent first lady Barbara Bush.

The bake-off was an attempt to appeal to stay-at-home moms following her controversial response to California governor Jerry Brown’s criticism that she owed her professional success to her husband, Bill. “I could have stayed home and baked cookies and had tea,” she told a reporter in a soundbite that was reported around the world. “But what I decided to do was fulfill my profession.” Many women responded with outrage, and perhaps that’s why, shortly thereafter, Clinton participated in the traditional Family Circle first lady bake-off. And won.

Late night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel asked the Democratic presidential candidate what Bill Clinton would be called in her White House. 

What Do We Call Bill Clinton If Hillary Wins? She Has Some Ideas

If Hillary Clinton is elected president in 2016, the nation won’t just have its 

first female president. We’ll also have our first male spouse of a president — and the need for a title other than “first lady.” 

Late night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel asked the Democratic presidential candidate what Bill Clinton would be called in her White House. 

“It’s a little bit more complicated with him because people still call former presidents ‘Mr. President,’ so I have to really work on this,” Clinton said on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” on Thursday night. 

However, in the case of Bill and Hillary Clinton, as in the case of a few other US Presidental dynasties, the title of POTUS may not be so singular.

If Hillary wins the White House, this will be the first time the President is a spouse of a former President, but there have been a few times Presidents have shared a last name. And when this happens, typically people refer to the former President by a nickname or by their full name:

John Adams (2nd) was Father of John Quincy Adams (6th). The father is generally called John Adams, while the Son is called JQA, or John Quincy Adams.

Get him out of Washington as much as possible, so that he doesn't interfere with her presidency and her people.
Benefit from his advice, privately -- the way GWB apparently got advice from GHWB.

Bill Clinton 1st first gentleman, 1stfirstgentleman.com

If Hillary Clinton is elected President in 2016, there will be 2 President Clintons in the

1stfirstgentleman.com
United States. Bill Clinton has joked about being called the "First Man" or "First Dude."

Many people think he will be called the "First Gentleman." I just can't see it. Bill Clinton is many things, but somehow GENTLEMAN doesn't fit.

Friends of Bill say in the book that the former president with the wandering eye 'dreaded' the idea of going back to the White House in 2017 because he would be 'trapped' there, leashed, without room for his libido to run or any meaningful say in government policy.
He would also find his wings clipped – literally losing his ability to jet-set and entertain celebrities nonstop in exotic locales between $750,000 speaking engagements.
'Why would he want to be the first spouse?' a Clinton confidant told Halper.
'What's he going to do? Live back in the White House and do the Christmas cards?'
Officially, according to presidential scholars and historians, the wily and philandering former president would be known as America's 'first gentleman' – a line ready-made for late night comics.

If Hillary Clinton is elected President in 2016

Would she mirror her husband Bill, who embraced former Goldman Sachs 

executive Robert Rubin's vision to repeal the Glass-Steagall Act, deregulate the telecom industry and sign the Commodity Futures Modernization Act, which exempted credit-default swaps from government oversight? 

Or will she follow in the footsteps of President Barack Obama, who signed the Affordable Care Act, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act and created the Consumer Financial Protection Board on the way to raising taxes on the country's highest earners for the first time since the late-1990s?

Mrs Clinton tweeted after Mr Trump's latest success: "Donald Trump is the presumptive GOP (Republican National Convention) nominee. Chip in now if you agree we can't let him become president"

So the real presidential race has not started yet?

Campaigning will step up a gear ahead of the US general election on November 8.

The two candidates will mount whirlwind tours of the nation to press their case to voters. There will also be three key televised presidential debates in the last six weeks before the nation goes to the polls.

Mr Trump, complete with his unfavourable ratings with Hispanic and female voters, will have a fight to become the next resident of the White House. There are also many states which lean more to the Democrats than the Republicans.

I’m the most successful person to ever run for the presidency, by far”


I’m the most successful person to ever run for the presidency, by far

Hillary won’t follow Bill’s economic agenda

Hillary Clinton on Sunday galloped across Kentucky, where she tried to 

win votes before the state’s upcoming primary by declaring that she will tap her husband, former President Bill Clinton, to help fix the economy.

“My husband . . . I’m going to put in charge of revitalizing the economy because you know, he knows how to do it,” Clinton told supporters at an event in northern Kentucky, according to the Washington Post.

The Democratic front-runner was likely hoping to remind voters that, under Bill’s administration, economic growth averaged 4 percent per year.

The hint at what role Bill Clinton might have as the nation’s first male presidential spouse came in the wake of allegations last week that The Clinton Global Initiative made a commitment to give $2 million to a company partly owned by a woman who has been rumored to have been romantically involved with the ex-commander-in-chief.

Hillary believes that government, not the private sector, is the main engine of job creation. In October 2014, she said, “Don’t let anybody, don’t let anybody tell you that, ah, you know, it’s corporations and businesses that create jobs.” She wants to increase the size of government, which she believes will fix the economy. She is not concerned with budget deficits or the public debt, which now exceeds $19 trillion.

Those policies are not Bill Clinton’s.

In 1996, while running for a second term, President Clinton proposed economic policies that were consistent with the will of the majority of the people. In 1994, for the first time in 40 years, Americans had elected a Republican House of Representatives. House Republicans chose representative Newt Gingrich as speaker. Gingrich had led the Republicans to victory by making the local House campaigns national.

If Hillary wins 2016, what should we call Bill?

The prospect of Hillary Rodham Clinton entering the White House as the 

45th President of the United States raises the intriguing question: what will they call Bill? Since Eleanor Roosevelt’s day, the president’s wife has had the official title, First Lady, with her own team, working in the Office of the First Lady.

Unofficially, the title goes back further. Martha Washington, wife of George, was called the First Lady. So, in a sense, the title is as old as the American Constitution. But, say what you will about Bill Clinton, he ain’t no lady.

He has an eye for the ladies, of course, so calling him the First Lady’s Man would be apt and descriptive, but President Hillary might not like it. When Australia was governed by a woman for the first time, they called Julia Gillard’s partner the First Bloke, but that is not very American. Perhaps First Gentleman would fit the Bill.

Hillary Clinton Shapes Potential New Role for Bill Clinton

Former President Bill Clinton said Monday night that he's open to 

helping out the potential administration of his wife after former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke about what his role could be in a number of recent comments.

"I'll do whatever I'm asked to do, but I like this economic business," he said after a campaign event in the U.S. Virgin Islands when asked by NBC News about whether he is ready to jump back into policy at the White House again.

Hillary Clinton, who's still stuck in the fierce Democratic primary with Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, told a crowd in Covington, Kentucky, Sunday night that she would put her husband "in charge of revitalizing the economy, because, you know, he knows how to do it, and especially in places like coal country and inner cities and other parts of our country that have really been left out."

The declaration about Mr. Clinton’s potential place in a Hillary Clinton administration comes as her campaign is preparing to battle the likely Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump, and widening its efforts to win the support of white working-class voters. Those voters hold generally favorable opinions of Mr. Clinton, but view her with more skepticism.

Mr. Clinton’s more emotive style appears to resonate with blue-collar voters in ways Mrs. Clinton’s has not. Some 55 percent of voters nationwide said they do not believe Mrs. Clinton “cares about people like me,” according to a Quinnipiac poll conducted in February.

And Mr. Clinton’s record — a balanced budget, the creation of 22.7 million jobs and 7.7 million people lifted out of poverty — is in many ways simpler for Mrs. Clinton to pitch than Mr. Obama’s economic record, when economic growth has disproportionately benefited the wealthiest Americans.

“Hillary Clinton’s statement that if elected president she’d put Bill Clinton ‘in charge of revitalizing the economy … because, you know, he knows how to do it’ suggests she’s no longer touting the successes of the Obama economy, or even linking herself to it,” said Robert B. Reich, a secretary of labor during the Clinton administration who endorsed Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont in the Democratic primary.

Clinton’s top five vice presidential picks

Sen. Tim Kaine (Va.)  



The former governor turned senator has become a favorite among Clinton insiders.

They see the centrist as a rising star in the Democratic Party would could help Clinton carry Virginia, a must-win state for Republicans.

Team Clinton likes that Kaine has good ties with the business community, has foreign policy chops and is well-versed in the party apparatus — he is as former chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

Kaine, who was also very high on President Obama’s short-list in 2008, is also well-liked among his peers in the Senate.

“Tim Kaine is the best choice in my mind out of all [the potential candidates for VP.],” said one Democratic strategist. “He has the best quality of being a VP: loyal soldier, no delusion of being POTUS, all the donors love him. Fluent in Spanish, and just a great guy.” 

Clinton’s biggest weakness in the primaries has been with white men, a constituency where Kaine could help her.



Sen. Sherrod Brown (Ohio)


Brown is another name getting a lot of buzz.

He’s a favorite in media circles on the left. No less than MSNBC star Rachel Maddow has hailed Brown as a smart VP pick who would help Clinton connect to white, working-class men.

Brown could obviously be helpful in swing-state Ohio, and Clintonites think Brown’s brand of authentic progressivism could be a hit in other Rust Belt states such as Michigan—where Clinton surprisingly lost the Democratic primary to Bernie Sanders
.
A progressive who has been a longtime critic of globalization, he might also bring over some Sanders supporters who are considering staying home on Election Day.

“He would be an attractive counter-balance,” Manley said.

Brown has repeatedly said he is not interested, however, and some people believe him.

Another negative? Ohio Gov. John Kasich would get to choose his replacement, endangering a Democratic Senate majority.


Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) 


No pick — aside perhaps from Sanders himself — would excite the Feel the Bern crown more than Warren.

Team Clinton is more intrigued than ever about a Clinton-Warren ticket, and some strategists say the longer Sanders stays in the race, the more likely Clinton could pick Warren to be her running mate.

Warren remains the only Democratic woman in the Senate who has not endorsed Clinton, an irksome fact to some in Clinton’s orbit.

But Warren’s Twitter war with Trump over the last week has raised her vice presidential stock tremendoustly.


Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez


Perez is very well-liked in the White House and maintains a close relationship with Obama chief of staff Denis McDonough.

Many see him as having all the right attributes to fill the ticket and win over progressives.

Unions love him, plus he speaks fluent Spanish could help further drive Latinos to Clinton's column. 

Perez told reporters this week that he has had “no conversations” about a possible VP role.

Instead, he said, he is focused on his job and “in my spare time” is also helping to elect Clinton. 

Gov. John Hickenlooper (Co.) 


Some in Clintonworld say the Colorado governor's name should be on any short list.

For starters, a win in Colorado would cement the race for Clinton.

Hickenlooper has also been a loyal soldier to Clinton during the primary, particularly when his state voted for Sanders by nearly 20 percentage points.

Clinton and Hickenlooper spent time together in April when she attended a fundraiser at his home.

Insiders say if he doesn't get a nod for VP, Clinton will likely consider him for a cabinet position, should she be elected.